1Percent

Ed Miller’s Poker’s 1%

Two nights ago, I purchased Ed Miller’s latest ebook, Poker’s 1%. I finished reading it yesterday.

Before I offer my opinion on Ed’s book, I’d like to provide some background of my learning process with GTO so far.

I’ve spent a good deal of time and effort in GTO land over the last six months or so. I’ve struggled with the most basic concepts since I first read Mathematics of Poker in early 2007. When learning new things, I often frustrate teachers and my learning process because I find difficulty moving forward unless I feel I thoroughly understand every detail of what’s already been discussed. This digging often has me prematurely diving into advanced concepts. Over the last six months, I’ve:

• Reread much of Mathematics of Poker
• Read Tipton’s Expert NoLimit Holdem Volume One
• Read Janda’s Applications of NoLimit Holdem (not quite finished yet)
• Read Newall’s The Intelligent Poker Player
• Watched many videos on GTO at DeucesCracked
• Engaged in discussions with these authors and video producers
• Posted thoughts/questions in forums
• Played with ideas in software, etc.

Gleaning from the work of these producers, I’ve straightened out a few misconceptions and have a better understanding of the moving pieces. However, I still have much to learn, and I still have unanswered questions and concerns. I’ll blog more about those soon.

Poker’s 1%

My appreciation for Ed’s teaching style is 10-years running. He has a knack for simplifying complicated topics. While I typically dig past simplifications, I always benefit from his insights.

Upon seeing the marketing for Poker’s 1%, I was skeptical. More so, I was afraid I would be disappointed.

I wasn’t disappointed with Poker’s 1%. If you’re a student of the game struggling with Janda’s book or the other GTO books, I recommend you get Ed’s book. I feel Ed has fulfilled his niche quite well in GTO land. As far as I can tell, he’s done a great job of presenting a 30,000 foot view of GTO.

I say “as far as I can tell” because I’m still hashing this stuff out myself.

Ed confesses in several places that he doesn’t have accurate numbers and in some spots has yet to truly understand proper application of the frequencies. He points the reader to more advanced material to work out details. He also offers something of arbitrary frequencies without spending much time explaining when to deviate from the standard frequency he offers. One criticism I have for the book is it would have been more valuable with a few chapters—instead of a few paragraphs—dedicated to the variables that dictate changes in frequencies.

The most valuable thing I gleaned from Ed’s book is motivation to begin working on situations myself. Ed made me feel like I now have the ability to start analyzing my range and frequencies. I start this process today. This kick-in-the-pants alone was worth the price of entry.

Poker’s 1% is a small book. I finished reading in about 2.5 hours. The book boils down to a hand-held tour of the big picture of GTO. You’ll have to decide if you need this tour for the price of the ticket. I’m happy I took the tour.

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Books by Owen Gaines Forums Ed Miller’s Poker’s 1%

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    QTip
    Keymaster

    Two nights ago, I purchased Ed Miller’s latest ebook, Poker’s 1%. I finished yesterday.

    Before I offer my opinion on Ed’s book, I’d like to provide some background of my learning process with GTO so far.

    I’ve spent a good deal of time and effort in GTO land over the last six months or so. I’ve struggled with the most basic concepts since I first read Mathematics of Poker in early 2007. When learning new things, I often frustrate teachers and my learning process because I find difficulty moving forward unless I feel I thoroughly understand every detail of what’s already been discussed. This digging often has me prematurely diving into advanced concepts. Over the last six months, I’ve:

    • Reread much of Mathematics of Poker
    • Read Tipton’s Expert NoLimit Holdem Volume One
    • Read Janda’s Applications of NoLimit Holdem (not quite finished yet)
    • Read Newall’s The Intelligent Poker Player
    • Watched many videos on GTO at DeucesCracked
    • Engaged in discussions with these authors and video producers
    • Posted thoughts/questions in forums
    • Played with ideas in software, etc.

    Gleaning from the work of these producers, I’ve straightened out a few misconceptions and have a better understanding of the moving pieces. However, I still have much to learn, and I still have unanswered questions and concerns. I’ll blog more about those soon.

    Poker’s 1%

    My appreciation for Ed’s teaching style is 10-years running. He has a knack for simplifying complicated topics. While I typically dig past simplifications, I always benefit from his insights.

    Upon seeing the marketing for Poker’s 1%, I was skeptical. More so, I was afraid I would be disappointed.

    I wasn’t disappointed with Poker’s 1%. If you’re a student of the game struggling with Janda’s book or the other GTO books, I recommend you get Ed’s book. I feel Ed has fulfilled his niche quite well in GTO land. As far as I can tell, he’s done a great job of presenting a 30,000 foot view of GTO.

    I say “as far as I can tell” because I’m still hashing this stuff out myself.

    Ed confesses in several places that he doesn’t have accurate numbers and in some spots has yet to truly understand proper application of the frequencies. He points the reader to more advanced material to work out details. He also offers something of arbitrary frequencies without spending much time explaining when to deviate from the standard frequency he offers. One criticism I have for the book is it would have been more valuable with a few chapters—instead of a few paragraphs—dedicated to the variables that dictate changes in frequencies.

    The most valuable thing I gleaned from Ed’s book is motivation to begin working on situations myself. Ed made me feel like I now have the ability to start analyzing my range and frequencies. I start this process today. This kick-in-the-pants alone was worth the price of entry.

    Poker’s 1% is a small book. I finished reading in about 2.5 hours. The book boils down to a hand-held tour of the big picture of GTO. You’ll have to decide if you need this tour for the price of the ticket. I’m happy I took the tour.

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