HardWork

Poker is Hard

“Playing strong exploitive poker is hard; it requires that you gather information in situations where that information is highly ambiguous and often misleading, calculate the inference from that information, and not expose yourself to counter-exploitation too much. But playing near-optimal poker is hard as well. Considering situations rather than hands and ensuring that one’s play is balanced among the various alternatives is very difficult.” – The Mathematics of Poker page 274.

No getting around it; poker is hard. Poker is difficult to learn, difficult to implement, and difficult to deal with the variance. Those coming to poker for a quick buck leave disappointed and typically less wealthy.

I’ve spent countless hours studying poker. I’ve spent countless hours teaching what I’ve learned. I have loads to learn yet.

Sometimes the task ahead of me is daunting and I wonder if I’m qualified to teach about the game. However, speaking with other players, I realize I have learned many things about the game. I am able to add value to other students’ learning experiences.

Recently, I’ve been encouraged as a poker student. I’m finding more things I don’t know, always a great launching pad for moving to another skill level. I understand problems on a deeper level now, one step closer to solutions. Excitement is building for me because I think I’m getting ready to reach another plateau in the game.

I’ll likely take a break from grinding in the near future to dedicate more time to studying the game.

Fun, fun.

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Books by Owen Gaines Forums Poker is Hard

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    QTip
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    “Playing strong exploitive poker is hard; it requires that you gather information in situations where that information is highly ambiguous and often misleading, calculate the inference from that information, and not expose yourself to counter-exploitation too much. But playing near-optimal poker is hard as well. Considering situations rather than hands and ensuring that one’s play is balanced among the various alternatives is very difficult.” – The Mathematics of Poker page 274.

    No getting around it; poker is hard. Poker is difficult to learn, difficult to implement, and difficult to deal with the variance. Those coming to poker for a quick buck leave disappointed and typically less wealthy.

    I’ve spent countless hours studying poker. I’ve spent countless hours teaching what I’ve learned. I have loads to learn yet.

    Sometimes the task ahead of me is daunting and I wonder if I’m qualified to teach about the game. However, speaking with other players, I realize I have learned many things about the game. I am able to add value to other students’ learning experiences.

    Recently, I’ve been encouraged as a poker student. I’m finding more things I don’t know, always a great launching pad for moving to another skill level. I understand problems on a deeper level now, one step closer to solutions. Excitement is building for me because I think I’m getting ready to reach another plateau in the game.

    I’ll likely take a break from grinding in the near future to dedicate more time to studying the game.

    Fun, fun.

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